Kids Garden Waste Guide

How to make a compost heap and loggery

We passionately believe in recycling and encouraging and maintaining areas which allow the local ecosystem to flourish.

That’s why we’ve decided to prepare a guide for anyone thinking of building a compost heap or a loggery, as these eco-friendly havens can help boost the overall health of your garden for insects, birds, small mammals and amphibians.

A healthy garden is a happy garden, and by making both of these you can do your bit for the world and have a lot of fun at the same time!

How to build the perfect compost heap

We passionately believe in recycling and encouraging and maintaining areas which allow the local ecosystem to flourish.

That’s why we’ve decided to prepare a guide for anyone thinking of building a compost heap or a loggery, as these eco-friendly havens can help boost the overall health of your garden for insects, birds, small mammals and amphibians.

A healthy garden is a happy garden, and by making both of these you can do your bit for the world and have a lot of fun at the same time!

  1. Choose the right siteFirst take a look around your garden and have a think about where would be the best place for a compost bin/heap. Ideally you’ll want somewhere that is in partial shade and on bare soil which is relatively level and free draining so puddles don’t form at its base. After all, nobody wants soggy compost!
  2. Worms are your friendPicking the right area will help you will attract worms – a compost heap’s very best friend. Worms love the dark and damp environment that a compost heap provides, and return the favour by eating the waste materials and turning them into liquid feed and compost. You can buy worms online, in garden centres or in fishing shops. Handy tip – tiger worms are the most efficient at converting your waste into compost. They’re rubbish removal machines!
  3. Add the right ingredientsMake sure to keep adding the right kind of things to your compost. This includes anything which is biodegradable, such as plant and vegetable peelings, grass cuttings, tea bags and egg shells. Cardboard and scrunched up paper takes longer to rot but also provides some much needed fibre and carbon to your heap. This is a fun way of recycling. Make sure you get everyone at home to help you!
  4. And don’t add any of the bad stuffNever add any dairy or meat products to your pile unless you want complaints from your neighbours. If you have a pet, don’t use your compost as a refuse for their waste as it will create an almighty smell and attract pests. And although it goes without saying, your plastics, glass and metals are meant for the council recycling bin not your compost bin!
  5. Keep a good balanceThis is probably the most important thing to get right for your compost heap. The perfect recipe is to have a 50/50 mix between your ‘greens’ and your ‘browns’. If you think your compost is too dry add some greens, too wet, throw in some more cardboard – this will help to air out the insides.
  6. Patience is a virtueIt usually takes between 9-12 months for compost to become ready for use. During this time make sure to maintain the right levels of greens and browns in your pile, but ultimately you’ll have to be patient and let nature take its course.
  7. Ready to useOnce your compost has become a dark brown, crumbly material resembling thick, spongy soil you now know it has become ready to use. Spreading it onto your flower beds, vegetable patches and lawn provides them with healthy nutrients and greatly improves the quality of your soil.
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